Evangelism

Who I Am–Part IV

Psalm 37:23
“The steps of the righteous man are ordered by the Lord.”

I’m kind of addicted to tattoos. Have you figured that out yet? I actually have a “tattoo guy.” He’s done all but the first three of my tattoos. He solidified his position when he custom-designed the frog on my foot. You see, I had a necklace that had a decorative tree frog hanging from it. I loved the design and wanted to use it for a tattoo, but three or four different tattoo parlors were unable to convert that frog into a two-dimensional image. So I walked into one more tattoo parlor and that’s where I met Garrett. He looked at the necklace, excused himself for about five minutes, and came back with exactly what I had envisioned.

There was just one problem. The only way to make the details crisp and clear, he told me, was to make the frog about FOUR TIMES the size I’d imagined! I hesitated briefly, but I’d been wanting this tattoo for years. I trusted his professional instinct, and he was right about the colors and the design. But I have to be honest, there are some days when I still think the frog is a little big, a little much, a little too conspicuous. But then, every now and then, I’ll run into a stranger or an acquaintance, and they’ll comment, “Hey, cool frog!” It reminds me that there are very few people who see that tattoo day after day. Most only get a glimpse in passing.

And that reminds me that it isn’t just about my tattoo. It’s about how many people that I pass by on any given day, and how many people only get a glimpse of me. And I think to myself, What do I want them to see? And the answer, of course, is, Jesus. I want them to see Jesus. So maybe that looks like a smile for a cashier at the grocery store, holding a door open for someone whose hands are full, giving up a seat for someone who needs it more than I do. Maybe it looks like grace for someone who makes a mistake, forgiveness for someone who has let me down, sympathy for someone who is suffering, peace in the midst of turmoil, joy in the midst of grief, or patience with my kids. I want to make the most of the glimpses that people get of me, and that means seeing every moment for its full potential. It means watching for opportunities to love, give, and serve.

My frog tattoo is the only tattoo I have that, to be honest, had no meaning or symbolism when I chose it. I can’t tie it to a Bible verse, or an adventure, or a dream. But even so, if it reminds me to embrace those opportunities to give people glimpses of Jesus, that’s meaning enough for me.

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Of Sandals and Seeds

Luke 4:24, 28-30

“‘Truly I tell you,’ he continued, ‘no prophet is accepted in his hometown’…. All the people in the synagogue were furious when they heard this. They got up, drove him out of the town, and took him to the brow of the hill on which the town was built, in order to throw him off the cliff. But he walked right through the crowd and went on his way.”

Matthew 10:14

“If anyone will not welcome you or listen to your words, leave that home or town and shake the dust off your feet.”

Do you ever feel like God has given you something worthwhile to say, but the only people who really hear it are total strangers? Or maybe you feel like no one hears you at all. Well, take heart, this phenomenon is nothing new. In fact, Jesus himself faced the same thing. He made the claim in Luke 4:24 that “no prophet is accepted in his hometown.” He then gave a couple of prominent examples before the town folk of Nazareth drove him out of town under the threat of death. And do you know what Jesus did? He “walked right through the crowd and went on his way” (Luke 4:30).

Now, you and I won’t likely ever be prophets, per se, but we would still be wise to follow our Lord’s example. He advised as much when he sent his disciples out on mission, saying, “If anyone will not welcome you, or listen to your words, leave that home or town and shake the dust off your feet” (Matthew 10:14). It sounds harsh, I know. But any time the disciples were forced to leave in this manner, they were leaving something behind—the seeds of the Gospel, the seeds of faith.

And those seeds are invasive. Do you remember when Jesus talked about faith the size of a mustard seed? (Matthew 17:20; Luke 17:6) Why did he choose that illustration? Was it because a mustard seed is so small? Or could it have been because mustard was an invasive species—a WEED? Have you ever had to water a weed? Provide it with nutrients? Of course not. And while we always want to plant seeds of the Gospel in good soil, the seeds of faith tend to have a mind and trajectory of their own.

Need evidence? Look no further than the book of James. This James was, contrary to what some believe, NOT James, the disciple of Jesus. Rather, it was his BROTHER! The story told in Luke 4 would lead us to believe that this James remained in Nazareth when Jesus left. He may even have joined the rest of the town folk in scorning Jesus—although I like to believe he stopped shy of the death threats.

But we can safely assume that James was not a “follower” of his brother’s early on. Nonetheless, we see that he later came to his senses and came to his savior. And he went on to write one of the most poignant books in the Bible. So it would appear that, as Jesus “went on his way” that day, he left something behind in the dirt he brushed from his sandals—SEEDS, seeds of faith and seeds of the Gospel.

Believer, don’t give up. You are a sower of seeds. You won’t always see or know the eternal outcomes of the work you are doing now. And even when you need to walk away for a time, you can rest in the hope that you may one day return to witness a harvest that you could not have dreamed or imagined. So keep sowing good seeds, and whenever you dust off your sandals, be sure you leave some of those seeds behind.

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Draughts

1 Corinthians 10:16 (MSG)

When we drink the cup of blessing, aren’t we taking into ourselves the blood, the very life,
of Christ? And isn’t it the same with the loaf of bread we break and eat?
Don’t we take into ourselves the body, the very life, of Christ?

 Ephesians 5:19-20 (MSG)

Drink the Spirit of God, huge draughts of him. Sing hymns instead of drinking songs! Sing songs from your heart to Christ. Sing praises over everything, any excuse for a song to
God the Father in the name of our Master, Jesus Christ.

This past Sunday, as I approached the communion table, I did what I always do. I pulled a piece of bread from the loaf and moved to dip it in the bowl of grape juice. But like always, I hesitated momentarily. Was it to reflect on the gravity of the moment? Or to thank God for his gift of salvation? No. Instead, I was calculating my ‘dipping depth’ in such a way that I would avoid a soggy, dripping piece of bread. Pure sacrilege, I know.

And in that moment, with songs of praise and worship playing around me, it hit me. This was a metaphor for the Christian life—at least the way many of us are prone to live it. Think about it. We want a taste of what God has to offer us, but we always seem to want just enough.

  • We sing along with the songs during worship, but we don’t let the lyrics really permeate our hearts.
  • We talk about God at church and at home—but not at work, not at the gym, not out with friends.
  • We wave to our neighbors in passing, but we don’t truly get to know them or let them get to know us (or our God).
  • We serve dinner at a homeless shelter once a year (or once EVER), but we don’t reach out to build relationships with the people there.
  • We pray for healing, but don’t accept the form of healing that God sometimes gives.

I could go on and on, but I think you get the picture. And I think you could probably add a few more examples to this list yourself. We want to dip our toes into the waters of salvation, but we don’t want to dive in. But God doesn’t want us to dabble in our faith. He wants us to live it fully, proclaim it, and let it change us. Ephesians 5:19 instructs us to “drink the Spirit of God, huge draughts of him.” Do you know what that means? It means to drink of the Spirit in huge doses, gulps, or swallows.

How appropriate that this observation occurred to me on Baptism Sunday, when Christians of all ages and walks of life were making this declaration: “I’m all in for Jesus!” And I thought, What about me? Am I really living all in for Him?

Are you?

Bring Your Friends

Mark 2:2-5 

“A few days later, when Jesus again entered Capernaum, the people heard that he had come home. They gathered in such large numbers that there was no room left, not even outside the door, and he preached the word to them. Some men came, bringing to him a paralyzed man, carried by four of them. Since they could not get him to Jesus because of the crowd, they made an opening in the roof above Jesus by digging through it and then lowered the mat the man was lying on. When Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralyzed man,
“Son, your sins are forgiven.”

 Tijge’s Sunday school lesson last week focused on Mark 2:2-5, and the paralytic whose friends brought him to see Jesus. For days afterward, Tijge asked us questions about the story. Why couldn’t they use the door? Why did he have bad muscles? Why was the house crowded? Why did he need a mat? Over and over he would ask, trying to understand the story. He even built a diorama of the scene using various toys around the house. It was interesting to see how, even for a three and a half-year old, this story is compelling.

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When teachers speak on this passage, they typically speak of Jesus; or of the crowds; or of the paralytic. But once I heard a message that focused on the four friends that brought the paralytic to Jesus, and the teacher challenged audience members to be the kinds of friends that would do the same.

Awhile back, I considered this passage in light of Ecclesiastes 3:11. You see, sometimes I get so caught up in MY journey that I forget about those around me. But we should live not just with a focus on ourselves and our eternal destiny, but also on others. If God has set eternity in the hearts of ALL men, then we should seek to help others recognize and follow that longing in their own hearts; and in so doing, bring as many others with us as possible—to the cross, to Jesus, and to heaven.

And so I ask: Am I that kind of friend? Are you?